The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII
The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII
The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII

The Coronation Inkstand and Pen of King Edward VII

  • This one-of-a-kind silver-gilt inkstand and pen boasts a royal provenance and extraordinary history
  • They were used by Britain’s King Edward VII to sign his coronation oath in 1902
  • The objects later entered the collection of Victor Spencer, 1st Viscount Churchill
  • Highly prized in the Churchill family for over a century, they hold a significant place in history
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Item No. 30-9239
Price: Available upon request
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description
Royal provenance and an extraordinary history set apart this one-of-a-kind silver-gilt inkstand and pen. The objects were used by Britain’s King Edward VII to sign his coronation oath in Westminster Abbey during his coronation in 1902.

The Coronation Oath Act of 1688 required that all newly crowned monarchs swear a solemn oath to maintain the laws and customs of the country and of its inhabitants. Edward VII was no exception – when he was crowned on August 9, 1902, the King processed into Westminster Abbey, knelt before the altar and swore on the Bible his coronation oath, a copy of which he then signed using the present pen and inkstand.

The historic moment is commemorated by an engraving on the top of the inkwell, which reads: "This standish was used by King Edward VII on signing the Coronation Oath in Westminster Abbey being held on the occasion by Victor Albert First Viscount Churchill August 9th 1902." The octagonal form is further adorned by the Royal Arms and cypher of King Edward VII, with the initials “ER” for “Edward Rex.”

The inkwell and pen are accompanied by a hand-written letter from Randall Davidson (also known as Winton), then the Bishop of Winchester and later Archbishop of Canterbury, to Victor Spencer, 1st Viscount Churchill, in which he explains that the King personally chose this pen for his use at his coronation.

Davidson and Churchill both played a significant role in planning the coronation, though Churchill perhaps more so; he served as Lord Chamberlain for the big event. This branch of the Churchill family (cousins of Sir Winston Churchill) had a long history in England, playing a significant role in British politics for over two centuries. Viscount Churchill, the son of Francis Spencer, 2nd Baron Churchill, became particularly important to the Royal family. As a youth, he served as a Page of Honor to Queen Victoria, and later as Lord in Waiting in the Royal Household, before becoming Lord Chamberlain to Edward VII in 1902. He would later serve as Master of Robes at the coronation of King George V, Edward’s son and successor.

The inkwell and pen entered the Viscount’s personal collection following the coronation, where it eventually descended to Victor, 3rd Viscount Churchill, who died in 2017. Highly prized in the family for over a century, this pair has only recently appeared on the market. That its provenance boasts the names of both King Edward VII and Churchill makes it an exceptional rarity that holds a significant place in Royal history.

Bears hallmarks for George Fox, London 1902

7" wide x 7" deep x 5" high

Provenance:
Estate of the late Victor, 3rd Viscount Churchill (1934-2017)
specifications
Period: 20th Century
Origin:England
Depth:7.0 Inches
Width:7.0 Inches
Height:5.0 Inches
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