Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque
Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque
Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque

Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants by Henri Lebasque

  • This composition by Henri Lebasque captures the artist's family overlooking a vibrant sea
  • It is part of an important series of works composed by Lebasque in the French Riviera
  • Vibrantly hued, the work reveals the artist’s mastery over composition and color
  • As a whole, it is a stunning achievement of the Post-Impressionist period
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Item No. 31-0312
$885,000
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description
Henri Lebasque
1865-1937 | French

Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants
(Sainte-Maxime, The Children's Snack)

Signed “Lebasque” (lower right)
Oil on canvas

This extraordinary oil on canvas is a painterly triumph by the famed French Post-Impressionist Henri Lebasque. It is part of an important series of family portraits that the artist composed during their visits to the town of Sainte-Maxime, about halfway between Cannes and St. Tropez. Set on the terrace of their waterfront house, this charming tableau brings to life the vibrant color and convivial atmosphere of the legendary French Riviera.

The work reveals the artist’s mastery over composition and color. Light pink walls and verdant foliage frame the scene, lending it a sense of intimacy and privacy. Lebasque invites the spectator into the close circle of his family. Though it is set outdoors under the dappled sunlight of the clear blue sky, Lebasque still successfully conveys an intimacy that rivals the interior scenes of his contemporaries Edouard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. Lebasque is particularly renowned for his depictions of such personal subjects, capturing his family gatherings with a devotion that set him apart from other painters.

Lebasque's first visit to the French Riviera in 1906 was at the suggestion of his friend and fellow Fauvist, Henri Manguin. He was so enamored with the brilliant color and light of the region that he would frequently return, spending many summers there with his family, particularly in the town of Sainte-Maxime. Since his very first visit to the French Riviera, Lebasque's brightened canvases earned him the moniker "Painter of Joy and Light." These qualities are on full display in Sainte-Maxime, Le Goûter des Enfants, with both its vibrant palette, as well as Lebasque's bold, energetic brushstrokes. The contrasts of deep mauve and orange tones with soft greens and blues recall the palette favored by his Fauvist contemporaries, Manguin and Henri Matisse. As a whole, it is a stunning achievement of the Post-Impressionist period.

Lebasque was born in 1865 in Maine-et-Loire and moved to Paris in 1885, where he often visited the atelier of Léon Bonnat. He studied painting at the École des Beaux Arts, and fell under the influence of his fellow students Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard. Most notably, he was a founding member of the Salon d’Automne in 1903 along with Henri Matisse, the annual exhibition that in 1905 featured the controversial paintings of Matisse, Derain, Vlaminck, Manguin, Vuillard and Rouault. The critic Louis Vauxcelles dubbed the group Les Fauves, or "wild beasts," due to their use of bright colors and wild untamed lines. Lebasque enjoyed greater popularity and commercial success during his lifetime than the other artists associated with Fauvism, largely due to what critics considered a sophisticated and subtle fluidity in his work. Today, his works can be found in important museums around the world, including the Musée d'Orsay (Paris), the Museum of Fine Arts (St. Petersburg), the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza (Madrid) and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

This work is pictured in Henri Lebasque Catalogue Raisonné, Tome 1, 2008, by D. Bazetoux, no. 1468.

Circa 1917-18

Canvas: 48 1/4" high x 59 3/4" wide
Frame: 60 1/4" high x 71 1/2" wide
specifications
Artist: Lebasque, Henri
Framed:71.5"W x 60.25"H
Unframed:59.75"W x 48.25"H
Period: 1816-1918
Origin:France
Subject:Seascape
Depth:2.0
Width:71.5
Height:60.25
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