Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell
Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell
Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell

Quenches Thirst by Norman Rockwell

  • This extraordinary oil on canvas was composed by the iconic illustrator Norman Rockwell
  • The charming advertisement appeared in the March 20, 1920 edition of the Saturday Evening Post
  • His ability to tell a story on canvas made his works prized amongst advertisers
  • The present scene embodies Rockwell's gift for capturing the essence of American life
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Item No. 30-8314
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Norman Rockwell
1894-1978 | American

Quenches Thirst (Boy with Baseball Bat and Stick of Gum)

Signed “Norman Rockwell” (lower right)
Oil on canvas

A charming relic of a bygone era, this rare oil is the work of the inimitable American illustrator Norman Rockwell. The iconic artist’s ability to render the details and nuances of everyday life is on full display in this original advertisement, which features a young ball player enjoying a stick of Black Jack chewing gum. Executed by Rockwell in 1920, the early work was a special commission by the American Chicle Company, and it appeared in the March 20, 1920 issue of the iconic Saturday Evening Post.

When he was commissioned to create this work in 1920, Rockwell was not yet a household name, but he would go on to paint more than 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post alone. Black Jack gum was among innumerable products he would create advertisements for throughout his career, along with Jell-O, Coca-Cola, Crest Toothpaste, Campbell's Tomato Juice, and Post Cereals. While his ability to compose a narrative that connected with the lives of everyday Americans made him a favorite among readers, it was his genius for integrating products seamlessly into his idealized world that made him a favorite of the advertising industry. The present scene is a charming example of Rockwell's talent for highly compelling marketing, even at such an early stage in his career.

A consummate storyteller, Rockwell pulls the viewer into this scene, which perfectly captures a sense of youthful cheer. While it was painted nearly a century ago, it represents the timelessness of Rockwell’s works; transcending generations, his universal narratives continue to evoke a powerful and sentimental response. Unarguably the preeminent American illustrator of the 20th century, Rockwell's images tap into the nostalgia of the American people.

Thanks to the resonance of his compositions, Norman Rockwell led a very long and incredibly successful career as an artist. For over seven decades, Norman Rockwell captured the attention of millions of Americans with his innumerable magazine cover illustrations. Rockwell said himself, “Without thinking too much about it in specific terms, I was showing America I knew and observed to others who might not have noticed.”

Painting poignant pictures that graced the covers of Literary Digest, the Saturday Evening Post, Life, Country Gentleman, and Look magazines, Rockwell's distinguished career earned him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, the highest honor bestowed upon an American civilian. Mythical, idealistic, and innocent, his paintings evoke a longing for a time and place that existed in his rich imagination and in the hopes and aspirations of the nation.

This important work has been authenticated by Stephanie Plunkett, the Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Norman Rockwell Museum.

Circa 1920

Canvas: 24” high x 18” wide
Frame: 30" high x 23 7/8" wide

References:
Norman Rockwell: A Definitive Catalogue, Volume 1, by L. Norton Moffatt, p. 252
specifications
Artist: Rockwell, Norman
Framed:23 7/8"W x 30"H
Unframed:18"W x 24"H
Period: 1919-Present
Origin:America
Subject:Children
Width:23 7/8 Inches
Height:30 Inches
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