Gasolier by F. & C. Osler
Gasolier by F. & C. Osler Gasolier by F. & C. Osler Gasolier by F. & C. Osler Gasolier by F. & C. Osler Gasolier by F. & C. Osler
Gasolier by F. & C. Osler

Gasolier by F. & C. Osler

  • A symphony of glass and brass, this outstanding gas chandelier was crafted by F. & C. Osler
  • F. & C. Osler was the leading makers of chandeliers in the 19th century
  • This stunning 5-light fixture is constructed of moulded and cut glass in a variety of styles
Request More Info Add to bag
To order by phone or get more info call us at 1-888-711-8084
Item No. 29-2817
$49,850
description
specifications
Discover more
description
A symphony of glass and brass, this outstanding gas chandelier was crafted by F. & C. Osler, the leading makers of chandeliers in the 19th century. Designed in an elegant, classically-inspired style, this stunning 5-light fixture is constructed of moulded and cut glass in a variety of styles, including columns, fans and prismatic drops, accented by delicate brass hardware.

The Birmingham firm of Osler was established by Thomas Osler in 1807, when he joined a Mr. Shakespeare's glasshouse at Hockley. His sons Follett and Clarkson renamed the firm F. & C. Osler and by 1851, they were one of Britain's leading glassmakers. The firm created a twenty-seven foot glass fountain, an eight-month undertaking, which formed the centerpiece of the entire Great Exhibition of 1851. Amongst their other displays were glass busts of celebrity figures, as well as a pair of eight-foot candelabra, now at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, which Queen Victoria presented to Prince Albert in 1849.

The gasolier is stamped with a Patent Office Design Registry mark for 20th March 1879, registered design number 333560, and has been converted for electricity.

Circa 1879

51” high x 27" wide

F. & C. Osler was a leader in decorative glass production and specialized in glass furniture and chandeliers in the “brilliant” style for the overseas market. Emerging by the late 1870's, its name aptly describing its effect, the “brilliant” style involved covering the glass surface with intersecting cuts that created innumerable, often fragmentary shapes making up larger patterns. Basic motifs used included stars, hob-nail or polygonal diamonds, strawberry diamonds and fan scallops, out of which a dazzling surface effect was achieved. During the 1880’s, F & C Osler produced even more complicated designs in this style and took the art of “Brilliant Cut Glass” to new heights.

In 1856 the firm supplied a large chandelier for St Georges Hall, Liverpool, then the leading and richest port in the country. This was followed by other significant commissions including a thirty six light example for the Mansion House, London, and a spectacular Tudor table service for Aston Hall, open by Queen Victoria in 1858.
specifications
Maker: Osler
Period: 19th Century
Origin:England
Type:Chandeliers
Material:Glass
Width:27 Inches
Height:51 Inches
Discover more

Let There Be Light: Choosing the Right Antique Chandelier

At once dramatic and elegant there exist very few things that command a room and evoke a sense of splendor quite like a great chandelier For centuries these magnificent crystal bronze and colored glass creations have served as bellwethers of...
At once dramatic and elegant there exist very few things that command a room and evoke a sense of splendor quite like a great chandelier For centuries these magnificent crystal bronze and colored glass creations have served as bellwethers of...
read more
6 minute read

Luxurious Lighting

Regency Cut Glass Ormolu Candelabra Before electricity flooded interiors with on-demand lighting the rhythm of life was dictated by natural light While of course illumination by flame whether fueled by oil tallow or any manner of other substances has existed...
Regency Cut Glass Ormolu Candelabra Before electricity flooded interiors with on-demand lighting the rhythm of life was dictated by natural light While of course illumination by flame whether fueled by oil tallow or any manner of other substances has existed...
read more
Related Items
Back to Top back to top