A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh
A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh
A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh

A View of the Houses of Parliament by Thomas Greenhalgh

  • This immense Victorian cityscape was composed by the British painter Thomas Greenhalgh
  • The monumental work captures a view of the Houses of Parliament from the Thames
  • Greenhalgh is renowned for his highly detailed works capturing the architecture of London
  • His love for both architecture and draftsmanship is on display in this impressive work
Request More Info Add to bag
To order by phone or get more info call us at 1-888-711-8084
Item No. 30-8313
$128,500
description
specifications
Discover more
description
Thomas Greenhalgh
1848-1906 | British

A View of the Houses of Parliament from the Thames, London

Signed “T Greenhalgh” (lower left)
Oil on canvas

Victorian painter Thomas Greenhalgh composed this immensely important and masterfully executed 19th-century oil entitled A View of the Houses of Parliament from the Thames, London. The monumental cityscape, which was almost certainly a special commission, was painted at the apex of the British artist’s career, and it is undoubtedly the painter’s masterpiece. Greenhalgh brings exquisite attention to detail to this view of the Houses of Parliament in a scene that epitomizes his greatest achievements as both an artist and a topographer.

A View of the Houses of Parliament perfectly reflects the style and form that made Greenhalgh a success throughout his career. Measuring a remarkable 6 feet wide, the painting depicts a sweeping view of the Thames, a hub for 19th-century London’s thriving international trade and shipbuilding enterprises. Rising prominently in the distance is the Palace of Westminster, commonly known as the Houses of Parliament, as well as the Elizabeth Tower, which houses the iconic clock and bell Big Ben. The scene is brought to life by the cast of characters that inhabits the foreground, including dock workers aboard ships on the busy wharf. A similar, though less detailed view of the Houses of Parliament by John Anderson is currently in the collection of the Museum of London.

Greenhalgh portrays this lively and historic scene with a meticulous attention to detail that is characteristic of the painter. That level of detail and clarity, however, is enhanced by his use of oil paints; Greenhalgh more typically worked in watercolor, making this composition among the most highly detailed and vibrant he ever created. From the impeccable architecture of the London skyline against the rising sun to the billowing smoke and busy workers on the lively wharf, no detail has been left unfinished.

Thomas Greenhalgh primarily worked as a watercolorist throughout his career, creating works that captured the soaring architectural wonders of Victorian-era London. His love of both architecture and draftsmanship is clearly on display in the present work, as well as his remarkable handling of light and color. Similar examples of his work can be found in the Lytham St Annes Art Collection (Lancashire) and the Atkinson Art Gallery Collection (Manchester), though those examples are far smaller than the present oil on canvas.

Born in Lancashire in 1848, Thomas Greenhalgh was the son of a blacksmith. The youngest of seven children, he distinguished himself as a painter at an early age – by the time he was 14, his occupation was already recorded as “painter” in the local census. Eventually he moved to Southport, where he lived for the rest of his life and became influential in the local arts community. He joined the Southport Art Association and became an active exhibitor around the country, including at the Walker Art Gallery Liverpool, Manchester City Art Gallery and the Royal Hibernian Academy. Due to the high level of detail in his paintings, he was not a prolific painter – only approximately 60 of his original works are known, making this monumental example an exceptional rarity on the market.

Circa 1880

Canvas: 42” high x 72” wide
Frame: 55 1/2” high x 85” wide
specifications
Framed:85""W x 55 1/2"H
Unframed:72"W x 42"H
Period: 1816-1918
Origin:England
Subject:Cityscapes
Width:85" Inches
Height:55 1/2 Inches
Discover more

Top 5 Portrait Acquisitions of All Time

A portrait's purpose has always been to memorialize its subject Over time however these works of art become important historical relics in and of themselves Portraits capture the mood of a time and place thanks to hints such as the...
A portrait's purpose has always been to memorialize its subject Over time however these works of art become important historical relics in and of themselves Portraits capture the mood of a time and place thanks to hints such as the...
read more

John Atkinson Grimshaw: Truth to Nature

The consummate self-taught Victorian artist John Atkinson Grimshaw possessed an unquestionable gift for painting The influence of the Pre-Raphaelite Movement is apparent throughout Grimshaw s oeuvre and he worked these ideals to create awe-inspiring land and cityscapes unlike any artist...
The consummate self-taught Victorian artist John Atkinson Grimshaw possessed an unquestionable gift for painting The influence of the Pre-Raphaelite Movement is apparent throughout Grimshaw s oeuvre and he worked these ideals to create awe-inspiring land and cityscapes unlike any artist...
read more
Related Items
Back to Top back to top