Paul Revere...The American Patriot

Born in 1734 to a Huguenot silversmith, Paul Revere's patriotism and his contribution to the American decorative arts is of inestimable value. He was immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem, The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere which tells of how he heroically rode through the countryside warning of the approaching British troops. This legendary event along with his extraordinary work as a silversmith has left a lasting legacy for Paul Revere.

In addition to his participation in Boston's Revolutionary movement, Revere's accomplishments during his lifetime were numerous. He practiced dentistry, operated a hardware store for a time, gained popularity as a political caricaturist, designed and printed the Continental currency, and was a talented engraver. In fact, Revere was among the very few American silversmiths who had the talent to actually complete a piece of silver from start to finish, including the engraving.

In 1768, Revere crafted the most celebrated work of American silver, the "Sons of Liberty Bowl," now housed at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. After serving his country during the American Revolution, Revere resumed his role at the forefront of American silver producing elegant canns, pitchers, bowls, sauceboats, teapots and creamers, most in the neo-classical style. Today, his work is counted among the most important of the American decorative arts.

Paul Revere Teapot

Paul Revere Teapot

Paul Revere Teapot

Paul Revere Teapot