Did you Know

Patronage for Paul Storr

Patronage for Paul Storr

Though he held no official title, Paul Storr enjoyed patronage from many important and powerful figures throughout his career, including King George III. His first important commission came from the Duke of Portland, who requested a large gold font for his son's christening. Storr was 26… Read More »
The Fifteenth Army

General Patton: The Fifteenth Army

The Fifteenth was the last American field army to see service in Europe during World War II, and it was the last command of General Patton. After the end of the war, the Fifteenth was given the task of collecting historical information concerning the events of the European Theater of… Read More »
A Quick Look at Jasper

A Quick Look at Jasper

Josiah Wedgwood's jasper was the triumphant outcome of more than 5,000 experiments. Jasper was his most important contribution to ceramic art, and ranks among the most significant innovations in ceramic history since the Chinese invention of porcelain nearly a thousand years earlier. The… Read More »
The Vaults of Tiffany & Co.

The Vaults of Tiffany & Co.

The architects of Tiffany & Co.'s New York boutique on 5th Avenue wanted the building to remind visitors of the importance, rarity and preciousness of the treasures carried by the store. For that reason, all of the buildings doors were made to look like the doors of industrial bank vaults… Read More »
17th-Century Hungarian Hetman Mace

17th-Century Hungarian Hetman Mace

In the 16th-18th centuries, the bulava-mace was the main insignia of the Hetman, the highest military power in the land. Today, bulava-maces are classified by the manner of their manufacture and adornment. Four types are distinguished - Hungarian, Turkish, Persian and Armenian. The… Read More »
Victor Boivin French Silver Chocolate Pot Victor Boivin French Silver Chocolate Pot

Hot Chocolate History

It wasn't until the end of the 18th century that Europeans began preparing chocolate with milk and sugar to create what is known as hot chocolate. The drink became so popular that many of the leading European silver and goldsmiths began making specialized pots just to serve the decadent… Read More »
Chinoiserie Bronze Fire Screen

Fire Screens and Chenets

Fire screens and chenets were a staple of any well-appointed home, serving as both decorative and useful objects. They were placed in front of a fireplace to protect priceless rugs and flooring from rolling logs, and ladies' wide skirts from flying sparks and embers. Read More »
Grand Tour Souvenir of Temple of Vespasian and Titus

The Grand Tour

During the 19th-century, it was a requisite for young gentlemen of high social standing to take an extended, educational tour of the Continent known as their Grand Tour. Fine objects d'art were created by artisans as luxurious mementos of Grand Tours for those who could afford the… Read More »
Celestial and Terrestrial Globes

Celestial and Terrestrial Globes: Why the difference in dates?

There is commonly a difference between the dates of terrestrial and celestial globe pairings. Globe makers often made celestial models in advance, since the stars and constellations were considered established and unchanging. New lands were constantly being discovered around the world, and… Read More »
Symbols in Art: The Waffle

Symbols in Art: The Waffle

Waffles, as symbolized by the waffle iron in the magnificent painting, The Battle Between Carnival and Lent by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, were considered delicacies in medieval Europe. Invented circa 1377, the selling of these sweet cakes near churches was originally considered… Read More »