Did you Know

Enamel

Enamel

Enamel is not paint. It is actually a thin coat of glass applied to a metal which melts and becomes fused to the metal when heated. Careful consideration to melting point must be made when pairing enamels to metals, which traditionally were gold, silver and copper. The piece must be fired… Read More »
Oyster Veneer

Oyster Veneer

The sophisticated use of oyster veneer was a striking innovation that William III brought to English furniture from Holland at the end of the 17th century. In this process, paper-thin cross sections cut from the roots and small branches of trees, their concentric rings resembling oyster… Read More »
Davenport Desk

Davenport Desks

Originating in the 1790s, Davenport desks were first made by the renowned Gillows of Lancaster and London cabinetmakers at the request of a Captain Davenport. They were produced in all stylistic varieties of the period, but Regency versions are some of the most sought-after by collectors.… Read More »
Lorestan (Luristan) Bronze

Lorestan (Luristan) Bronze

Lorestan (Luristan) bronze refers to a set of Early Iron Age bronze artifacts that have been recovered from the Lorestan and Kermanshah areas in west-central Iran. Believed to have been produced either by the Cimmerians or by Indo-European peoples of Media or Persia, they include a great… Read More »
Glass

Roman Glass

Glass was one of the most popular and useful materials in nearly every aspect of daily life in ancient Rome. Though the Romans did not invent glass, they revolutionized its production, particularly with the invention of glassblowing in the 1st century B.C.E., and mold-blowing, or blowing… Read More »
Paul Storr

Paul Storr

Without question, Paul Storr is considered one of history's finest smiths, and he is known for perfecting the works, styles and designs of the Regency period. From his Neoclassical masterpieces to his exuberant, ornate vessels, Storr imparted a level of craftsmanship and superior quality… Read More »

Reed & Barton

Reed & Barton, established in 1824, is one of the oldest silver manufacturing firms in the United States. They have long been an industry leader and pioneer in the art of silversmithing. The "Francis I" pattern is their most recognized achievement, featuring 15 different… Read More »
René Lalique

René Lalique

René Lalique remains one of the most popular sculptors of the Art Deco period, and glass aficionados and amateur collectors alike continue to marvel at the grace, magnificence and accuracy of his creations the world over. A significant contributor to the Art Deco movement, he is not… Read More »
Thomas Chippendale: A Name All His Own

Thomas Chippendale: A Name All His Own

Thomas Chippendale was the first cabinetmaker to boast such a strong following that an entire style bears his name and not that of a monarch. In 1754, Chippendale published The Gentleman and Cabinetmaker's Director, considered to be the "bible" of furniture design of its day. The designs… Read More »
François Boucher: Director of the Royal Tapestry Workshops

François Boucher: Director of the Royal Tapestry Workshops

François Boucher was chosen as Director of the royal tapestry workshops in the mid-1730s. The French painter's fertile imagination and unified aesthetic turned out to be well-suited to the medium. In total, Boucher designed forty-five tapestries for Beauvais, including the current… Read More »