Did you Know

Paul Storr

Paul Storr

Without question, Paul Storr is considered one of history's finest smiths, and he is known for perfecting the works, styles and designs of the Regency period. From his Neoclassical masterpieces to his exuberant, ornate vessels, Storr imparted a level of craftsmanship and superior quality… Read More »

Reed & Barton

Reed & Barton, established in 1824, is one of the oldest silver manufacturing firms in the United States. They have long been an industry leader and pioneer in the art of silversmithing. The "Francis I" pattern is their most recognized achievement, featuring 15 different… Read More »
René Lalique

René Lalique

René Lalique remains one of the most popular sculptors of the Art Deco period, and glass aficionados and amateur collectors alike continue to marvel at the grace, magnificence and accuracy of his creations the world over. A significant contributor to the Art Deco movement, he is not… Read More »
Thomas Chippendale: A Name All His Own

Thomas Chippendale: A Name All His Own

Thomas Chippendale was the first cabinetmaker to boast such a strong following that an entire style bears his name and not that of a monarch. In 1754, Chippendale published The Gentleman and Cabinetmaker's Director, considered to be the "bible" of furniture design of its day. The designs… Read More »
François Boucher: Director of the Royal Tapestry Workshops

François Boucher: Director of the Royal Tapestry Workshops

François Boucher was chosen as Director of the royal tapestry workshops in the mid-1730s. The French painter's fertile imagination and unified aesthetic turned out to be well-suited to the medium. In total, Boucher designed forty-five tapestries for Beauvais, including the current… Read More »
Patronage for Paul Storr

Patronage for Paul Storr

Though he held no official title, Paul Storr enjoyed patronage from many important and powerful figures throughout his career, including King George III. His first important commission came from the Duke of Portland, who requested a large gold font for his son's christening. Storr was 26… Read More »
The Fifteenth Army

General Patton: The Fifteenth Army

The Fifteenth was the last American field army to see service in Europe during World War II, and it was the last command of General Patton. After the end of the war, the Fifteenth was given the task of collecting historical information concerning the events of the European Theater of… Read More »
A Quick Look at Jasper

A Quick Look at Jasper

Josiah Wedgwood's jasper was the triumphant outcome of more than 5,000 experiments. Jasper was his most important contribution to ceramic art, and ranks among the most significant innovations in ceramic history since the Chinese invention of porcelain nearly a thousand years earlier. The… Read More »
The Vaults of Tiffany & Co.

The Vaults of Tiffany & Co.

The architects of Tiffany & Co.'s New York boutique on 5th Avenue wanted the building to remind visitors of the importance, rarity and preciousness of the treasures carried by the store. For that reason, all of the buildings doors were made to look like the doors of industrial bank vaults… Read More »
17th-Century Hungarian Hetman Mace

17th-Century Hungarian Hetman Mace

In the 16th-18th centuries, the bulava-mace was the main insignia of the Hetman, the highest military power in the land. Today, bulava-maces are classified by the manner of their manufacture and adornment. Four types are distinguished - Hungarian, Turkish, Persian and Armenian. The… Read More »