Jehan George Vibert

Jehan George Vibert
1840-1902 • French

Parisian artist Jehan George Vibert was famous for his amazingly detailed and humorous paintings of satirical cardinals.

Vibert began his career studying first under his grandfather, Jazet, who was a celebrated engraver. The artist soon realized that his true calling was painting, and enlisted in the studio of artist F. J. Barrias. At 16, Vibert enrolled at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, where he soon excelled to the top of his class. He continued his studies there until the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War in 1870, at the onset of which he joined the military as a member of the “sharpshooters.” Vibert was wounded at Malmaison and was awarded the medal of the Légion d’Honnour for his valiant efforts during the conflict.

Vibert returned to his passion of painting, which he continued until 1899. During his extensive career, the artist proved to be somewhat of a “renaissance man,” excelling in the fields of watercolor, writing, and acting. He co-founded and became president of the Sociéte des Aquarellistes Français (Society of French Watercolors), and in 1891, he wrote the book La Science de la Peinture (The Science of Painting). Vibert also found time to write numerous essays for the American publication The Century Magazine, as well as several notable plays.

He exhibited extensively at the Paris Salon his entire career, earning much praise for his masterpieces that extended far beyond Europe. Many famous Americans commissioned works from Vibert, including John Jacob Astor and William Vanderbilt.
The Diet by Jehan George Vibert

The Diet by Jehan George Vibert