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Nécessaire: The Greatest Travel Companion + GIVEAWAY!

December 2nd, 2014 | posted by James Gillis
Gold gilded silver and cut crystal accentuate the various toiletries inside

Gold gilded silver and cut crystal accentuate the various toiletries inside

Travel during the late 16th century all the way through the early 19th century was considered a privilege and a symbol of wealth shared only by those who were fortunate enough to afford the luxury. Upon completing their academic studies, young gentlemen and women of high social standing would spend time traveling throughout Paris, Venice, Florence, and Rome visiting the great masterpieces of art and architecture that they had studied throughout their time in school.  These young socialites would travel for days, months, and even years absorbing all the cultural knowledge of their travels.  Of course, these lengthy journeys required a convenient means of transporting their personal belongings, or necessities, of daily use.

Often constructed of luxurious materials such as silver, gold, tortoiseshell, fine woods and leathers, nécessaires were chests that held a wide range of ‘necessary’ scent bottles and small cosmetic tools for daily use. Each traveler’s nécessaire was unique in its own way and was often designed to reflect the owner’s noble status. Not only were they practical travel kits, but they also were great symbols of wealth and personal taste.

The inside features 11 cut crystal boxes and jars with beautifully engraved silver gilt tops and toiletries accented with mother-of-pearl handles.

The inside features 11 cut crystal boxes and jars with beautifully engraved silver gilt tops and toiletries accented with mother-of-pearl handles.

In our gallery, we have several impressive nécessaires, each filled with everything from essential toiletries and jewelry to sewing and writing instruments.

The first chest, an English nécessaire de voyage, is a 24-piece nécessaire from 1849. Crafted of the finest coromandel wood, this stunning chest features a fitted, leather and green velvet-lined interior, and houses various cut crystal perfume bottles and utensils. The bottom compartment features a lockable drawer, perfect for concealing and protecting valuables. This case is both beautiful and practical.

The second chest is a similar, English nécessaire veneered with elegant coromandel wood. The interior of this impressive chest is comprised of 11 cut crystal boxes and jars with beautifully engraved silver gilt tops and toiletries accented with mother-of-pearl handles. This nécessaire also features two secret compartments, each opened by pressing discreet buttons located inside. This compact travel kit is perfect for light travel.

Nowadays, it is extremely rare to find such remarkable and personalized travel kits simply due to the fact that travel has become such a regular, everyday occurrence. These nécessaires offer an interesting glimpse into past methods of travel.

 

GIVEAWAY

 

We’re excited to announce our first ever giveaway! Enter below for your chance to win this scholarly yet approachable book by William Rau!

This beautiful book sheds new light on the history of 19th-century European painting by examining the works of over 200 masters, covering dozens of movements from Romanticism to Impressionism, and everything in between. Masters of 19th-century art, including Corot, Bouguereau, Alma-Tadema, Godward, Monet, Renoir, van Gogh, Pissarro, Mönsted, Grimshaw, Dawson, Elsley, Vibert, Soulacroix, Herring, Sr., Delacroix, Courbet, Lewis, and Gerome are examined.

The winner will be announced 2 weeks from today, December 16, 2014. Good luck to all!

Accessorizing The Holiday Table

November 25th, 2014 | posted by Susan Lapene
The only four known 18th-century silver cheese stands are in museums or private collections

The only four known 18th-century silver cheese stands are in museums or private collections

Get festive and have the best place setting this holiday season. With some our most unique and special items, you can set the table for this holiday and impress all your thanksgiving guests.

Make your appetizers and delightful snacks look exquisite for your extended family in our Silver Georgian Cheese stand is truly one of a kind. Made by London Silversmith Soloman Houghman, this cheese stand is only one of four that was crafted from silver. With plenty of room for crackers and delicious cheeses, you will surprise all your guests with a beautiful array of everyone’s favorite hors d’oeouvres. Add some fresh grapes and light greenery and you have the perfect presentation.

This rare and lovely majolica oyster stand by Minton would be the star of any dining affair.

This rare and lovely majolica oyster stand by Minton would be the star of any dining affair.

 

 

 

Add even more decadence to your room and hors d’oevures display with this rare Majolica Oyster Stand by Milton. With four tiers of twenty seven shells that end in an eel and fish decorative finial atop, this piece would be the star of your dining collection. Place any variation of your favorite oyster recipe in each shell and amaze your guests with such a beautiful presentation. Milton was Europe’s leading ceramic factory during the Victorian Era and prevails in importance and rarity today.

This extraordinary Victorian silver plate biscuit box boasts expert craftsmanship and a stunning design.

This extraordinary Victorian silver plate biscuit box boasts expert craftsmanship and a stunning design.

During the main course, keep your yummy biscuits fresh and warm in this Victorian Silver Plate Biscuit Box. Adorned in figures from the Early Roman Empire, this continuous relief decoration represents symbolic sacrifice in the traditions of this period. This biscuit box is set atop a matching silver tray and is crowned with a magnificent eagle finial. This unique box serves not only a symbol of outstanding, but a symbol of the extraordinary talent and craftsmanship during the Victorian era.

Distinguished by a ring of hobstars contrasted by smooth flutes circling the rim and center, this compote is a treasure for the American cut glass enthusiast.

Distinguished by a ring of hobstars contrasted by smooth flutes circling the rim and center, this compote is a treasure for the American cut glass enthusiast.

Can’t forget the best part of the meal! Enjoy a delicious spiced apple dessert served in one of our magnificent cut glass compotes. Our Aberdeen American Cut Glass Compote, crafted by the Jewel Cut Class Company of Newark, represents truly remarkable artistry and skill. It is of the Aberdeen pattern, also known as Hobstar and Flutes, which is considered one of the premiere patterns of all the cut glass motifs. Any scrumptious dessert would be beautifully presented in this compote.

An Invitation to a Masterpiece – Picasso

November 20th, 2014 | posted by Deborah Choate

Artist, Creator, Poet…Pablo Picasso, an artist known to almost every ear, rests as one of the most prolific and well-known artists, individuals, and influencers in the history of art. Mainly working in the abstract and cubism fields, this 20th century Spanish artist created paintings, ceramics, prints, drawings, and various writings. He is known as a co-founder of the Cubist movement, a revolutionary field of art that firmly secured itself within the avant-garde and represented abstracted objects in a way to give multiple viewpoints. This flourishing movement came with various international influences, such as African and Native American. Like Picasso, these artists were immensely curious in the stark and strong appearances and emotions evoked by these robust and unique cultures.

Originally printed as an invitation to his 1961 ceramics exhibition at the Madoura Gallery

Originally printed as an invitation to his 1961 ceramics exhibition at the Madoura Gallery, this rare, original linocut mimics the strong, linear style of Picasso’s modern ceramic designs.

For Picasso, this influence from unique cultures left a lasting impression on his sculpture. Ceramics created during his vast career hold designs and patterns similar to modern, abstract, and primal aesthetics. One such ceramics exhibition held in 1961 at the Madoura Gallery captured enormous interest and adoration of this modern style. The ceramics, while ranging in size, shape and color, all possessed Picasso’s strong, linear style. What aided the popularity and positive analysis of the exhibition were the stunning invitations

This unique item was originally drawn and printed by Picasso as an invitation for his stunning sculpture exhibition. It is a linoleum-cut print that features designs of certain ceramics that were present at the show. Three different horizontal registers contain three drawings that speak to certain pieces and aesthetics that were present in his exhibition. Most of these invitations were lost or destroyed and few, such as this one, are preserved and were never sent. Printed on fine woven paper, this print is number 18 of only 100 copies and Picasso’s signature is found in the bottom left hand corner.

The invitation, petite yet prominent in its presence, reveals Picasso’s striking artistic innovation. It represents not only new influences in art, but the elasticity of Picasso’s talent. These abstract, linear, and bold designs are extraordinary in their design and are a testament to the phenomenal craftsmanship that Picasso possessed.

At a Second Glance – Pietre Dure

November 14th, 2014 | posted by Ludovic Rousset

The creation of exquisite, magnificent Renaissance art involves more than just paint on canvas; its influence is perpetual and never-ending.

The technique requires these pieces of stone to be meticulously cut to create a flawless scene

The technique requires these pieces of stone to be meticulously cut to create a flawless scene

This piece, A Game of Dice by Alfonso Montelatici, shows the use of the Pietre Dure technique. Developed from the Ancient Romans and then revived by 16th century Renaissance craftsmen, this craft involves the process of using various fitted and polished cut stones and fine marbles to create an overall picture. The Italian term literally means “hard stones” as different colored small stones are precisely chosen for placement and interlocked together so that the contact between each is almost invisible. The stones would then be inlaid onto a stone base. Often, craftsmen of this technique would choose very refined and rare types of marble and materials to heighten the elegance of the overall piece.

Not only requiring a vast amount of time and expenses, this technique required highly skilled craftsmen who could articulate images with stone in the same ways as in the Renaissance. The Montelatici family is credited for the revival of this intricate technique. Natives of Italy, the father of Alfonso, Giovanni, founded a workshop called Arte Musiva where numerous foreign buyers would flock to purchase their unique and stunning pieces. Later, Giovanni’s two sons joined him in the workshop. While there are not many details on the life of Alfonso, it is known that he had a unique stylistic approach to this stone “painting” technique that involved bold coloring and a gallant atmospheres.

This piece reflects the work that Italian Renaissance craftsmen perfected. If you look at this from a distance it seems like a traditional oil on canvas painting. However, when approached, you can discern the small pieces of stone and marble that make up the different cheery figures and shapes. The scene depicts two jovial men playing a game of dice while a woman happily looks on. The interior of the scene is communicated by fine pieces of taupe, brown, and grey marble, thus speaking to their own materiality as they depict a marble and stone like floor and wall surfaces. The robust, contrasting coloring and solidarity of the surface gives the figures weight and dimensionality. Regarding this piece, the viewer can almost feel the light atmosphere of the room and the echoing, cool feeling of the stone walls. It would be impossible for one to merely glance at this image and not desire to emulate the gaiety and happiness of the characters before you.

It is extraordinary that craftsmen at this time could yield such unique and remarkable pieces. Today, however, these pieces are extremely difficult to acquire. Though there were prolific craftsmen of the twentieth century who worked in this style, many do not reappear today.

D.H. Chiparus: Master of Art Deco Sculptures

November 5th, 2014 | posted by Danielle Halikias

The Art Deco period was renowned for its sculptures featuring high quality figures with rhythm and movement. During this time, a new style of decorative art emerged that was a complete change from the heavy romantic late nineteenth century style. This new style was inspired by the joie de vivre of the young society of the 1920s. At the forefront of this movement was Romanian born sculptor, Demetre Chiparus who is now considered to be one of the masters of Art Deco bronzes.

Born in 1886, Chiparus began to show interest in sculpture art at a young age. He began his studies in Italy and later in France, where he studied under famous artists such as Mercié and J. Boucher at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. It was in Paris where he perfected his famed chryselephantine technique. This process involved employing a combination of carved ivory and bronze to create stunning, lifelike sculptures. The combination of the cold-painted bronze along with the ivory to depict flesh was unlike anything seen before. Inspired by Russian ballet and French theater, Chiparus created a theatrical female form in his sculptures. These bronze women are depicted as long and slender and are often adorned in elegant costumes.

A magnificent Art Deco bronze sculpture by D.H. Chiparus entitled Friends Forever

A magnificent Art Deco bronze sculpture by D.H. Chiparus entitled Friends Forever

We are fortunate to have a spectacular and rare sculpture by Chiparus here at M.S. Rau.  Entitled, Friends Forever, this piece features a delicate female and her canine companions crafted of bronze and ivory set atop a stunning onyx and marble base.  This graceful figure is as detailed as it is engaging. The etched signature “D.H. Chiparus” is found on the base and the foundry stamp “L.N/Paris/J.L.” is found on the woman’s skirt.  Come by our gallery today to see this remarkable Art Deco chryselephantine sculpture in person.

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