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The Very Best of Art Deco

March 29th, 2013 | posted by Susan Lapene
Egyptian Art Deco Chandelier

Egyptian Art Deco Chandelier

Brooch

Art Deco Diamond and Rock Crystal Brooch

I just returned from the Art Deco World Congress 2013 held in Habana, Cuba and have been thoroughly inspired to present my very favorite Art Deco pieces to you.  I want to share a range of items that came out of this movement, because the way it transformed everything from sculpture to lighting is truly astounding.

Though the movement was an expression of the progressive and forward-thinking attitudes of the Machine Age, this eclectic style was greatly influenced by the so-called “primitive” arts of Africa and ancient Egypt.  The worldwide press coverage that the discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb drew certainly popularized these elements.  Translating organic themes into streamlined, mathematical shapes is one of the most well-known signatures of this striking design aesthetic.  Take, for instance, this fabulous chandelier that displays a geometric Egyptian motif.

Mounted in luminous platinum and 18k gold, as well as featuring a link of the purest rock crystal, this Art Deco pin radiates the opulence associated with the movement.  Whether worn as a brooch or in place of a buckle at the waist, on a wide grosgrain ribbon as a bracelet, as a hair ornament, or glitzing up a classic black satin evening clutch this pin is as versatile an accessory now as it was during the heyday of Art Deco.

Bearing the telltale streamlined elegance of Art Deco, this Cartier clock is crafted from a plaque of exquisite jade set into a frame of enamel-accented silver. This wonderful 8-day clock would have been at home in the most stylish of offices or residences.

Cartier Art Deco Jade Clock

Cartier Art Deco Jade Clock

Art Deco Gold Box by Cartier, Paris

Art Deco Gold Box by Cartier, Paris

Also by Cartier, this gold box captures the essence of Art Deco sophistication. Crafted entirely of 18K yellow gold, this exceptional objet d’art bears a sleek geometric pattern accompanied by contrasting black champlevé enamel on all sides. The box was most likely used as a cosmetics compact and would have been an essential accessory for a well-heeled lady. Such diminutive works of art are found most often in prestigious collections throughout the world, representing a bygone “golden age” of luxury and style.

Even the fine arts were impacted by the new ideals of Art Deco. “Friends Forever” by Demetre Haralamb Chiparus is a charming figure of a young girl and her two borzoi, or Russian wolfhound companions, comprised of patinated, cold-painted bronze and intricately carved ivory, a combination known as chryselephantine. The combination of ivory and bronze was pioneered in Belgium at the turn of the 20th century. Sculptors of the Art Deco period embraced this technique, re-interpreting the classical style to create figures of subtle beauty. Chiparus was a champion and master of this technique and he is credited with both perfecting and giving this form its Art Deco flavor.

 

Friends Forever Bronze and Ivory by Chiparus

Friends Forever Bronze and Ivory by Chiparus

All of these pieces express the various wondrous qualities of Art Deco.  My time in Cuba certainly reinvigorated my love of Art Deco, and I hope this selection has piqued your curiosity. Which item interests you the most?

Good Things Come In Small Packages

March 11th, 2013 | posted by Ludovic Rousset
This rare English 18th-century agate and gold étui exhibits a graceful Rococo style. Adorned with exceptional carving and gold mounts, this charming étui opens with the push of a button. Circa, 1770.

This rare English 18th-century agate and gold étui exhibits a graceful Rococo style. Adorned with exceptional carving and gold mounts, this charming étui opens with the push of a button. Circa, 1770.

Flawlessly crafted in the neoclassical style, this container is made of various shades of gold and is distinguished by panels of peaked guilloche engraving. Borders of foliate, floral and ribbon chasing complete the design. Circa, 1760.

Flawlessly crafted in the neoclassical style, this container is made of various shades of gold and is distinguished by panels of peaked guilloche engraving. Borders of foliate, floral and ribbon chasing complete the design. Circa, 1760.

About a year ago, M.S. Rau purchased a collection of étuis – the jewel-like decorative cases used in the 18th century to store small items or to discreetly pass notes between members of nobility. Within weeks, we had sold them all, delighted to learn that in the current age of technology, people still appreciate the possibility of a handwritten note. We recently acquired another set of étuis, each one distinctive and utterly collectible. What makes these gems of history so special is not just their beauty, but their fascinating biography as well.

Étuis take their name from the Old French word “estuier,” meaning “to keep or hold.”  Although we now associate them with secret written exchanges of the European elite, an étui is a very versatile item. These ornamental cases could be made of any material, from precious metals like gold or silver, to exotic materials such as tortoiseshell or shagreen. Though many were used for more clandestine reasons, some also served the more practical purpose of holding small items such as scissors, thimbles, needles, or even a doctor’s lancet. To maintain the security of the more confidential notes contained within these items, sometimes the exteriors would be sealed with wax.

I cannot think of a more elegant way to give a small gift, or make a note special, than tucked into one of these pieces, can you?  View all of our available étuis here.

 

A Jewel of Perfection: The Rare Golconda Diamond

February 11th, 2013 | posted by Bill Rau
This amazing 8.03 Golconda Diamond is Internally Flawless and cut in a luxurious marquise shape

This amazing 8.03 Golconda Diamond is Internally Flawless and cut in a luxurious marquise shape

There once was a time when India was the only place in the world where diamonds could be found. Beginning more than 2,000 years ago, in the current state of Hyderabad, diamonds were first excavated in the heavily fortified kingdom of Golconda. It is from these mines that the most famous diamonds, including the Hope and Koh-I-Noor, originated. Today, the exceptionally rare handful of jewels determined to be Golcondas are the most coveted diamonds in the world.

But why? What makes Golconda diamonds so special that they command a premium of 50% or more than that of a D-color diamond from any other locale? It all has to do with color. More accurately, their value lies in their amazing lack of color.

Golconda diamonds are graded as Type IIa, which means that the stone is totally void of nitrogen. Nitrogen is the element that gives diamonds a yellowish tinge. Without it, the stone is able to transmit UV and visible light that other diamonds block, making Golcondas so incredibly pure and transparent that they actually appear to be two to three shades whiter than any other D-color diamonds.

This Internally Flawless, pear-shaped Golconda Diamond weighs 3.02 carats.

This Internally Flawless, pear-shaped Golconda Diamond weighs 3.02 carats.

Today, it is estimated that fewer than 2% of all the diamonds mined throughout the world can be graded as Golcondas. They are so rare, in fact, that most jewelers and gemologists can go their entire careers without even seeing one in person.

In India, Golconda diamonds were enveloped in magic and mysticism. The gems were believed to embody the powers of the gods, granting the owner limitless wealth, prosperity and power, so much so that only kings and high priests were allowed to possess them. Though we know that a Golconda diamond won’t grant your every desire, there is no denying their breathtaking beauty.  Elusive, exotic and captivating in every way, there’s no question why Golcondas are accurately referred to as the ultimate diamond.

Visit our online gallery to view our selection of Goldonda Diamonds and other diamond rarities, including incredible Colored Diamonds.

Windows Into a Lost World: Pre-Columbian Pottery

January 18th, 2013 | posted by Bill Rau
This incredible Nayarit Warrior Figure represents a highly respected chieftain, as indicated by the horns, staff and seated posture.

This incredible Nayarit Warrior Figure represents a highly respected chieftain, as indicated by the horns, staff and seated posture.

The peoples of Central America used animal symbolism in their pottery, such as this Veraguas Feline Figure, which most likely illustrating a spiritual transformation

The peoples of Central America used animal symbolism in their pottery, such as this Veraguas Feline Figure, which most likely illustrating a spiritual transformation

While much of Europe was in the throws of the artistic and social decline known as the Middle Ages, across the Atlantic, the ancient cultures of the Americas were experiencing a vibrant cultural period distinguished by fascinating works of art, particularly pottery.The Pre-Columbian era generally refers to the span of time in the Americas prior to the voyages of Christopher Columbus in 1492. However, the term more accurately describes the history of Native American cultures before significant contact with or conquest by Europeans.

Regardless of the location in either North, Central or South America, archeological evidence proves that all of these cultures were incredibly proficient in ceramics. Since many Pre-Columbian cultures lacked formal writing systems, pottery became their history books–a visual vehicle to express and pass on their knowledge of the world, encompassing religion, cosmology, philosophy and even astronomy.

M.S. Rau Antiques’ collection of Pre-Columbian artifacts was assembled by a private collector in the 1960s and covers various cultures throughout Mexico and Central and South America from about 1800 B.C. to A.D. 1530. Many of these wares were used to venerate important figures in society, while others served more mystical purposes by depicting shamanistic rites and spiritual awakenings. This West Mexican Nayarit Warrior Figure with Staff was crafted in honor of a great warrior chieftain. Imagery including the baton, large horn-like extensions atop the head and seated posture are notable symbols of high social standing.

The peoples of Central America had a particular affinity for animal symbolism, as illustrated by this Veraguas Feline Figure from Panama. Most likely used as a ritual vessel, these animal-centric forms often referred to shamanistic transformations, giving animal qualities to individuals undergoing a spiritual transformation.

This Incense Burner, or Incensario, was likely used in a ritual and filled with a hallucinogenic herb that allowed for spiritual awakening.

This Incense Burner, or Incensario, was likely used in a ritual and filled with a hallucinogenic herb that allowed for spiritual awakening.

These ceramics are more than remarkable works of art, they provide unique insight into the fascinating ancient cultures that shaped our history.

Click here to view M.S. Rau Antiques’ entire collection of Pre-Columbian artifacts.

Treasures of the Sea: Amazing South Sea Pearls

December 21st, 2012 | posted by Bill Rau

South Sea Pearl Earrings

Baroque South Sea pearls are the perfect blend of classical elegance and modern flair. These dynamic jewels command considerable attention on the market..

Deep in the warm waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, between the northern coast of Australia and the southern coast of China in an area commonly referred to as the “South Seas,” one of nature’s most outstanding treasures is being created.

It takes a minimum of two years for the large Pinctada maxima oyster to create a single South Sea pearl. Each begins its life as a tiny bead of mother-of-pearl carefully implanted into the mollusk. It is these implants that serve as the pearl’s nucleus, accepting layer upon layer of the oyster’s unmistakably vibrant nacre (the shimmering mother-of-pearl substance of which pearls are made), ultimately giving birth to the most desirable pearls in the world. These dazzling gems of the ocean are renowned not only for their tremendous size, but their breathtaking luster; characteristics that set the South Sea pearl above all others.

Measuring between 9mm and 18mm, South Sea pearls owe their great size and brilliance to several factors. The favorably temperate waters of the South Seas speed the mollusk’s metabolism and increase the amount of nacre it is able to produce. The thick layering of this particular nacre is famed for its peerless glow, which appears to radiate from within the jewel, adding to the pearls rarity and desirability. The grand size of the Pinctada maxima itself, measuring upwards of a foot in diameter, allows the gem to develop unhindered in a spacious environment. Also, the waters of the South Seas are incredibly clean and rich in plankton, the oyster’s primary food. Truly, the more content the oyster, the more impeccable the pearls!

South Sea pearls come in a rainbow of colors. This opulent necklace showcases pearls of the highly sought-after gold hue.

This Golden South Sea Pearl Necklace boasts 31 magnificent jewels of the highly coveted gold hue. Ranging in size from 12mm-15mm, each of these brilliant pearls is exceptional in it’s own right, but combine them in one necklace, and you have reached a level of brilliance that took many years to achieve. When you consider that a single pearl of this size can take nearly a decade to form, combined with the fact that one must search thousands upon thousands of mollusks to maybe find a beautifully round, symmetrical gem, the true rarity of these precious treasures of the sea takes your breath away.

Click here to view and learn more about M.S. Rau Antiques’ selection of South Sea pearls

 

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