Archive for the 'Fine Art' Category

Lebasque in the Summer

May 31st, 2013 | posted by Phillip Youngberg
Lebasque embraces the techniques of the post-impressionists, the Nabi painters and the fauvists.

Lebasque embraces the techniques of the post-impressionists, the Nabi painters and the fauvists.

Summer is in full bloom here in New Orleans and has been for some time. As the temperature rises and the Creole tomatoes appear, our thoughts turn to the carefree days of vacation – maybe a quick trip to the Gulf Coast for a weekend or, if you’re lucky, a proper holiday to the south of France.  The vibrant feeling of summer days is captured perfectly in a painting we just acquired by the artist Henri Lebasque that depicts a mother and daughter in an intimate embrace looking out toward a vivid Mediterranean sea. Colorful and sentimental, this work embodies the myriad influences on Lebasque’s technique and the absolute beauty of coastal France.

Lebasque and his family first went to Saint-Tropez in 1904 at the invitation of fellow artist Henri Manguin, who had taken to painting there part of the year. By the 1900s Saint-Tropez had become well established as a destination for Parisians seeking sun and relaxation and had attracted a number of artists, including the post-impressionist painter Paul Signac. Under Signac’s influence Lebasque adopted the post-impressionist technique of dividing color into complementary tones which created greater tonal brilliance in his paintings.

Promenade a Saint-Tropez was painted a year before Lebasque’s first solo exhibition at the Galerie Georges Petit in Paris and exactly one year after the famous Salon d’Automne show of 1905.  We can see some of the influence of fauvism in the present work with the artist’s use of juxtaposed color to suggest light and space as well as his bold, frenzied and passionate brushstrokes. The subject matter of domestic life in natural surroundings is quintessential Lebasque, a result of his time spent with the Nabi painters, Vuillard and Bonnard, and the contrasts of deep purple and mauve tones with brilliant greens recall the palette favored by his fauvist contemporaries, Matisse and Manguin.

Just about everyone who walks by this painting in our gallery has a strong reaction to its beauty. If you are in New Orleans, you simply must come by and see it in person. The dramatic brushstrokes and color will transport you to the magnificence of the Mediterranean in an instant. Click here to see more of M.S. Rau Antique’s fine art collection.

The Very Best of Art Deco

March 29th, 2013 | posted by Susan Lapene
Egyptian Art Deco Chandelier

Egyptian Art Deco Chandelier

Brooch

Art Deco Diamond and Rock Crystal Brooch

I just returned from the Art Deco World Congress 2013 held in Habana, Cuba and have been thoroughly inspired to present my very favorite Art Deco pieces to you.  I want to share a range of items that came out of this movement, because the way it transformed everything from sculpture to lighting is truly astounding.

Though the movement was an expression of the progressive and forward-thinking attitudes of the Machine Age, this eclectic style was greatly influenced by the so-called “primitive” arts of Africa and ancient Egypt.  The worldwide press coverage that the discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb drew certainly popularized these elements.  Translating organic themes into streamlined, mathematical shapes is one of the most well-known signatures of this striking design aesthetic.  Take, for instance, this fabulous chandelier that displays a geometric Egyptian motif.

Mounted in luminous platinum and 18k gold, as well as featuring a link of the purest rock crystal, this Art Deco pin radiates the opulence associated with the movement.  Whether worn as a brooch or in place of a buckle at the waist, on a wide grosgrain ribbon as a bracelet, as a hair ornament, or glitzing up a classic black satin evening clutch this pin is as versatile an accessory now as it was during the heyday of Art Deco.

Bearing the telltale streamlined elegance of Art Deco, this Cartier clock is crafted from a plaque of exquisite jade set into a frame of enamel-accented silver. This wonderful 8-day clock would have been at home in the most stylish of offices or residences.

Cartier Art Deco Jade Clock

Cartier Art Deco Jade Clock

Art Deco Gold Box by Cartier, Paris

Art Deco Gold Box by Cartier, Paris

Also by Cartier, this gold box captures the essence of Art Deco sophistication. Crafted entirely of 18K yellow gold, this exceptional objet d’art bears a sleek geometric pattern accompanied by contrasting black champlevé enamel on all sides. The box was most likely used as a cosmetics compact and would have been an essential accessory for a well-heeled lady. Such diminutive works of art are found most often in prestigious collections throughout the world, representing a bygone “golden age” of luxury and style.

Even the fine arts were impacted by the new ideals of Art Deco. “Friends Forever” by Demetre Haralamb Chiparus is a charming figure of a young girl and her two borzoi, or Russian wolfhound companions, comprised of patinated, cold-painted bronze and intricately carved ivory, a combination known as chryselephantine. The combination of ivory and bronze was pioneered in Belgium at the turn of the 20th century. Sculptors of the Art Deco period embraced this technique, re-interpreting the classical style to create figures of subtle beauty. Chiparus was a champion and master of this technique and he is credited with both perfecting and giving this form its Art Deco flavor.

 

Friends Forever Bronze and Ivory by Chiparus

Friends Forever Bronze and Ivory by Chiparus

All of these pieces express the various wondrous qualities of Art Deco.  My time in Cuba certainly reinvigorated my love of Art Deco, and I hope this selection has piqued your curiosity. Which item interests you the most?

A Loving Rendition

January 25th, 2013 | posted by Susan Lapene

This is not the first time Renoir’s adopted daughter had her portrait painted.

It’s November in 1904 and the young Jeanne, Mrs. Paul Valery, now 27 years old, receives a note from Pierre-Auguste Renoir.   “Would you care to come [to my studio] starting Tuesday morning, if there’s not too much fog?” A gentle request from one of the best loved Impressionists of all time. The result of that sitting and those to follow would yield the remarkable composition you see here.

Madame Paul Valery by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Madame Paul Valery by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The story of how Jeanne Gobillard became the ward of Renoir is quite the story; a story of love, friendship, and a commitment to both.

Berthe Morisot and her sister Edmé (the mother of Jeanne) were students of art.  Berthe even went on to study with Corot and was great friends with Édouard Manet, marrying his brother in 1874. She was the only female that exhibited in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874.   However, unlike most of the Impressionists, Morisot’s works were favorably critiqued by the Salon. Her most famous, The Cradle, was a painting of her sister Edmé gazing at her new born daughter Jeanne.

Jeanne's First Portrait

Jeanne’s First Portrait

A string of tragedies befall the family leaving Julie, the daughter of Berthe, and her cousins Jeanne and Paule orphaned.  Renoir volunteers to adopt all three of the girls and raise them as his own.  The four became very close and the tenderness Renoir felt for Jeanne is evident in this work of art.

Displaying Renoir’s spectacular skill for utilizing light and color, this composition is truly representative of his body of work.  Moreover, this portrait represents an intimate chapter in the artist’s life and gives a glimpse of who he was beyond the canvas and the brush.  The importance of their union in this masterpiece, as well as the fact that this is the first documented portrait Renoir completed of Jeanne, cannot be overstated. View this portrait on our website here or come visit us in New Orleans and see it for yourself!

A Classic Beauty

January 12th, 2013 | posted by James Gillis

Venus a La Tortue, after Antoine Coysevox

Collecting art is one of the most enjoyable pastimes. The thrill of the hunt for your next favorite piece is matched only by the joy of watching your collection grow. Collectors tend to have two different philosophies: the encyclopedic approach and the focused approach. Those who favor encyclopedic collections will carefully select examples from the spectrum of art history so they have a dynamic timeline of periods, artists and mediums. Focused collectors hone their tastes and collect intently on just that subject.

We have a sculpture in the gallery that would be an impressive piece for both a classical or encyclopedic collection. Venus á La Tortue depicts the captivating goddess of love as she kneels in a stream accompanied by a tortoise, a classic symbol of fertility. Sculpted in beautifully polished bronze, and resting atop a base of Rouge Griotte marble and ebonized wood base, Venus embodies the idealized female with her perfectly sculpted face and delicately proportioned body. Created after the artist Antoine Coysevox (1640-1720), a similar piece is housed in the Louvre.

Coysevox was one of the most important court painters under Louis XIV, executing many official portraits for the king and court. He is known for a mix of styles – the ornate baroque admired by the king and the classical, which resonated with aristocrats who liked the association to the great Roman Empire.  Like all art students of his time, Coysevox became skilled at copying classical sculptures to develop his talent. He later progressed into what would become his greatest legacy: portrait busts. His profound ability to capture both the physical likeness and the intangible ethos of his subjects won him many commissions, in addition to the king. He created the official tomb carving for the Cardinal Mazarin, now housed in the Louvre, an honor that would have only been bestowed on the preeminent artist of the period.

This statue particularly appeals to me for its still beauty. The Roman goddess Venus is one of the most captivating figures in mythology and one of the most depicted by artists of the ages. The sensuality depicted in this sculpture is subtle, certainly an influence from Coysevox who used nuance as one his greatest tools. Classical sculptures like this one bring new understandings each time they are viewed, and this is certainly the case with Venus á La Tortue. Every time I present Venus to clients in the gallery, I am drawn to new elements, whether it’s her soft musculature, the lovely drapery or the detailed adornments.

If you are in the New Orleans area, I invite you to come see this lovely depiction of Venus. You can also view this sculpture and the rest of our collection here.

Bouguereau and the Impressionists

December 13th, 2012 | posted by Deborah Choate

Secrets de l’Amour by William Adolphe Bouguereau

The holidays are in full swing here in the French Quarter, and that means decorations, parades and parties! It is also a special time here at the gallery as we recently opened our very first exhibition Impressionism: Influences & Impact. Showcased are impressionist masters like Claude Monet, Alfred Sissley and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, along with artists like Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, who influenced them, and Vincent van Gogh, who was inspired by the revolutionary movement.

You may instantly recognize Secrets de l’Amour (Cupid’s Secrets) as the work of one of the most decorated artists of the 19th century, William Adolphe Bouguereau. With the influence of light and color from the Impressionists, Bouguereau painted classically themed portraits of women. This masterpiece is the ultimate expression of Bouguereau’s artistic ideals and even features his favorite model, Odile Charpentier.

The artist’s passion for the classical past is felt powerfully in this exceptional composition that depicts a coy cupid draped over a young woman’s shoulder, which he appears to be advising in matters of the heart. Finessed with the utmost academic rigor to which Bouguereau was dedicated, this painting also seems to have a deeply personal significance as it was painted the same year he married his long-time love Elizabeth Gardner.

Bouguereau received tremendous acclaim during his lifetime; he so dominated the Salons of the Third Republic that the official Salon became known unofficially as “Le Salon Bouguereau”. He is still highly sought-after today and his works are held in a number of prestigious private collections, as well as museums around the world.

We are fortunate to have this stunning piece in our collection, and as one of the gems of the exhibition. If you are in the New Orleans area, I encourage you to visit the gallery and explore the fascinating history of Impressionism. Impressionism: Influences & Impact runs until Janurary 4, 2013 and more information can be found here.

« Prev - Next »